Design is a broad stream of subjects and isn’t limited to graphic design. When someone says “I’m a designer’, it is not immediately clear what they actually do day to day. There are a numerous pillars of responsibility which together holds design upright.

Design related roles exist in a range of domains viz, graphic design, textile design, interior design, fashion design, ceramic design, print design and more. With the relatively recent influx of tech companies focused on creating interfaces for screens, many new design roles have emerged.

Job titles like UX Developer or UI designer have emerged as the future front of design roles. Its meaning is unfamiliar even to designers who come from other industries.

Seperating UI UX

UX design refers to user experience design, while UI design stands for user interface design. Both of these are crucial to an IT product and need to work closely together.
Despite being very integral to each other, the roles themselves are quite different, involving distinct processes.

UX is User Experience

UX design is a still a relatively new field, with many companies only just waking up to the fact that they need someone on their payroll if they want to succeed in attracting and retaining customers.

Part of the confusion might lie in the name: UX design. For many people, the word “design” is associated with creativity, colors and graphics, when really its true definition lies in functionality, as well as the process behind making products that provide a seamless experience for the people who use them.

UX designer’s job will probably seem mysterious at first (“Wait, you don’t make graphics?”) and confusing at best. (“Why is the new designer interviewing people?”)

How UX design is informed by the users

Knowing who the target customers are, and how to make their experience with your product the most rewarding or ‘delightful’ it can be, is the responsibility of the UX design team. As such, ‘functionality’, ‘usability’ and ‘user adaptability’ ranks high in their priorities for the product.

UX designers are generally focused on development of digital products, but the theory and process can be applied to just about anything:

Strategy and Context:

  • Competitor Analysis
  • Customer Analysis
  • Product Structure/Strategy
  • Content Development

Wireframing and Prototyping:

  • Wireframing
  • Prototyping
  • Testing/Iteration
  • Development Planning

Execution and Analytics

  • Coordination with UI UX Designer(s)
  • Coordination with Developers
  • Tracking Goals and Integration
  • Analysis and Iteration

So, part marketer, part designer, part project manager; the UX role is complex, challenging and multifaceted. You see that iteration of the product, as connected to analysis or testing is indeed mentioned twice. But in reality you would put it in between every other item on the list.
Ultimately the aim is to connect business goals to user’s needs through a process of testing and refinement towards that which satisfies both sides of the relationship.